Wordpress

Administration Screens

In the context of WordPress, the “Administration screens” refer to the various sections and pages within the WordPress dashboard where site administrators can manage and configure different aspects of their WordPress website. These screens provide a user-friendly interface that allows website owners and administrators to control and customize their site’s content, appearance, functionality, and settings.
Some common examples of administration screens in WordPress include:

  1. Dashboard: The main page you see when you log in, which provides an overview of your site’s activity, recent comments, and other important information.
  2. Posts: This section allows you to create, edit, and manage your blog posts. You can also categorize and tag your posts here.
  3. Pages: Similar to posts, this section is used for creating and managing static pages on your website, such as an “About” or “Contact” page.
  4. Media: Where you can upload, organize, and manage images, audio, and video files that you want to use in your content.
  5. Comments: This screen lets you manage and moderate comments on your blog posts.
  6. Appearance: Here, you can customize the theme and layout of your website, including themes, widgets, and the site’s menu structure.
  7. Plugins: This section is used to install, activate, deactivate, and configure plugins to enhance your site’s functionality.
  8. Users: Where you can create and manage user accounts, assign roles, and control access to your website.
  9. Settings: This is where you configure various settings for your site, such as general site information, reading options, discussion settings, and more.
  10. Tools: Contains various tools and import/export options to manage your site’s content.
  11. Users: Within this section, you can create and manage user accounts for your website. You can assign different user roles, such as administrator, editor, author, contributor, or subscriber, each with varying levels of access and capabilities. This allows you to control who can make changes to your site and what they can do.
  12. Updates: Although not a separate screen, WordPress will notify you when updates are available for your core WordPress software, themes, and plugins. You can initiate updates and keep your website secure and up-to-date from the main dashboard.
  13. Customizer: While not strictly an “administration screen,” the Customizer is an important feature that allows you to preview and make real-time changes to your site’s appearance and settings before committing to them. It’s a user-friendly way to customize your site’s look and feel without affecting the live site until you’re ready.
  14. Permalinks: The Permalinks screen allows you to configure the structure of your website’s URLs. You can choose how the URLs for your posts and pages are formatted, which can impact search engine optimization (SEO) and the user-friendliness of your website’s links.
  15. Privacy: This screen is where you can define your website’s privacy policy page and link to it from your site’s privacy notice. It helps you comply with data protection regulations and inform your visitors about how their data is handled.
  16. Reading: In this screen, you can set your website’s front page and posts page, control the number of blog posts displayed per page, and configure how your site handles syndication feeds. It’s essential for controlling how your content is presented to visitors.
  17. Discussion: The Discussion screen is where you manage settings related to comments on your website. You can specify how comments are moderated, whether comment author information is required, and set up blacklists and other comment-related options.
  18. Widgets: This section allows you to customize the content displayed in your website’s widget areas, typically sidebars or other predefined areas within your theme. You can add, remove, and configure various widgets to enhance your site’s functionality.
  19. Menus: The Menus screen is used for creating and managing the navigation menus on your website. You can create custom menus, add pages, posts, categories, and custom links to create navigation structures that suit your site’s needs.
  20. Theme Editor: The Theme Editor provides access to the underlying code of your WordPress theme. You can edit theme files, including style sheets and templates, but this is typically used by more experienced users. Caution is advised when making changes here, as incorrect coding can break your site.
  21. Custom Fields: This screen allows you to define and manage custom fields for your posts, which can be used to add additional data or information to your content.
  22. Editor: The Editor screen, found under the Appearance menu, allows you to directly edit your theme files, including your theme’s style.css and template files. While it provides a way to make code-level changes, it’s important to exercise caution here, as incorrect edits can lead to issues with your website.
  23. Media Library: Under the Media menu, the Media Library screen allows you to manage all the media files (images, videos, audio) uploaded to your site. You can edit, delete, or view the details of your media items.
  24. Site Health: This screen provides information about your website’s performance and security. It checks for critical issues and offers recommendations for improving your site’s health and security.
  25. Block Editor: The Block Editor, also known as the Gutenberg editor, is where you create and edit your posts and pages. It uses a block-based approach, allowing you to add and arrange content using different blocks (e.g., paragraphs, images, headings, and more) for a more flexible content creation experience.
  26. Permalink Settings: Under the Settings menu, you can access Permalink Settings, which allows you to configure the structure of your site’s URLs for posts and pages. This is crucial for SEO and creating user-friendly, readable URLs.
  27. Import and Export: In the Tools menu, you can find options for importing content from another website or platform into your WordPress site and exporting your site’s data. This is useful for content migration and backup purposes.
    These administration screens and options provide users with the tools and flexibility needed to create and manage a website in WordPress. As a beginner, it’s important to familiarize yourself with these screens and their functions to effectively control and customize your site without delving into complex coding or technical details.
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